Common Questions & Concerns

Below is a list of some common questions, but please feel free to call our office if you need additional information, 229.244.3000. We are always pleased to assist you.


What is astigmatism?

A condition that causes blurred vision due to an elongated cornea or a misshaped lens causing light to hit many points on the retina (nerve layer in the back of the eye). The effect of astigmatism is glare and blurred vision. Astigmatism is very common and can be paired with myopia, hyperopia, or presbyopia. Astigmatism can normally be corrected with glasses or contact lenses.


What is hyperopia?

It is commonly called farsightedness. Hyperopia is a condition in which objects are clearer far away and blurry up close. With hyperopia, the shape of the eye is too short and light reflects behind the retina (nerve layer in the back of the eye). A hyperopic prescription is written with a (+) plus sign. Hyperopia can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Plus powered spectacle lenses will be thicker in the middle of the lens and thinner on the edge.


What is myopia?

It is commonly called nearsightedness. Myopia is a condition in which objects up close are clearer than objects far away. With myopia, the eye is elongated, causing light to reflect in front of the retina (nerve layer in back of the eye). A myopic prescription will be written with a (-) minus sign. Myopia can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Minus powered spectacle lenses will be thicker on the edge of the lens and thinner in the middle.


What is presbyopia?

It is a common condition of the eye that occurs as the eye ages. As the eye ages, the ability to focus on near objects diminishes. The onset of blurry vision caused by presbyopia may seem sudden, but actually takes years to happen. Most people notice the onset of presbyopia in their mid 40's. Most presbyopic patients will need reading glasses or glasses with a bifocal, trifocal, or progressive lens to be able to read. For some presbyopic patients, contact lenses are an option, rather than glasses.


What are single vision lenses?

Single vision lenses are the most common of all lenses prescribed for vision correction. A single vision lens has the same focal point all over the lens. This means that it corrects distance vision, near vision or intermediate vision (computer or at an arm's length), but not all lengths of vision in one lens. Single vision lens are usually prescribed to people under the age of 40.


What are bifocal lenses and how will they help me?

Bifocal lenses will correct for two visual problems with one set of glasses. The top part of a bifocal normally corrects distance vision, and the bottom portion of the lens will correct near vision, allowing you to see both distance and near in one pair of glasses. Most bifocals are recognized by the line in the bottom of the lens. A bifocal lens is normally prescribed to people over the age of 40.


What is a trifocal lens?

Trifocal lenses are used to correct three visual problems in one pair of glasses. Trifocals will allow you to see distance, intermediate and near. The top part of a trifocal will correct distance vision, the middle part of the lens will correct intermediate vision, and the bottom portion of the lens will correct near vision, which allows you to see distance, intermediate, and near in one pair of glasses. Most trifocals are recognized by the two lines on the bottom of the lens. A trifocal lens is normally prescribed to people over 40; however, the trifocal lens is a fading technology as it is being replaced by the progressive lens.

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